My Red Bones

Ethnic Ancestry:

Discover Your Roots with DNA

Most people are curious about their ethnic ancestry. Yet few of us have any real facts about the ethnic makeup of our ancestors. Even if we know the ethnic background of one or two recent ancestors, we don’t know our true proportions. What about our four grandparents? Our eight great-grandparents? And so on.

DNA testing can provide enlightening answers for us and our children. Speak with anyone, who knows anything about The People Known as Redbone they will tell you, their ethnic origins is a mystery. We have in the last few years broke down many walls but the plot and mystery only thickens, as the results are being tallied. Here is the link to Tribes Testing I took, results below.

Does genetic anthropology establish scientific criteria for race or ethnicity?

DNA studies do not indicate that separate classifiable subspecies (races) exist within modern humans. While different genes for physical traits such as skin and hair color can be identified between individuals, no consistent patterns of genes across the human genome exist to distinguish one race from another. There also is no genetic basis for divisions of human ethnicity. People who have lived in the same geographic region for many generations may have some alleles in common, but no allele will be found in all members of one population and in no members of any other. Indeed, it has been proven that there is more genetic variation within races than exists between them.

How strange that modern genetics is supposed to have invalidated the concept of race, yet, at every turn, it confirms most of the basic racial taxonomic observations of people working only with their eyes and, much later, their calipers.

Whole-Genome Genetic Diversity in a Sample of Australians with Deep Aboriginal Ancestry

Brian P. McEvoy et al.

Australia was probably settled soon after modern humans left Africa, but details of this ancient migration are not well understood. Debate centers on whether the Pleistocene Sahul continent (composed of New Guinea, Australia, and Tasmania) was first settled by a single wave followed by regional divergence into Aboriginal Australian and New Guinean populations (common origin) or whether different parts of the continent were initially populated independently. Australia has been the subject of relatively few DNA studies even though understanding regional variation in genomic structure and diversity will be important if disease-association mapping methods are to be successfully evaluated and applied across populations. We report on a genome-wide investigation of Australian Aboriginal SNP diversity in a sample of participants from the Riverine region. The phylogenetic relationship of these Aboriginal Australians to a range of other global populations demonstrates a deep common origin with Papuan New Guineans and Melanesians, with little evidence of substantial later migration until the very recent arrival of European colonists. The study provides valuable and robust insights into an early and important phase of human colonization of the globe. A broader survey of Australia, including diverse geographic sample populations, will be required to fully appreciate the continent’s unique population history and consequent genetic heritage, as well as the importance of both to the understanding of health issues.

Here are my results, not what you would expect from a “so called” average white American but even more, not what you would expect from a people so called Redbone~

Original Ethnic Testing done through www.dnatribes. com

Ethnicity Results, Stacy R Webb

Here is a file explaining some of the Aboriginal Australian DNA.

DNA Tribes Digest, Aboriginal Australian

Following is my East Asian Panel which was taken after the original testing reveled high levels of Aboriginal Australian mixed. The Aboriginal Australian are originally from India, they were Island hoppers from ancient times.

Central Asian Panel, Stacy R Webb

The Following is my Native American Panel

Native American Panel, Stacy R Webb

Subsequent Follow Up Analysis Reports for my results

DNA Tribes® analysis is updated on a periodic basis to include new reference data as well as
refinements to our match algorithms and world regions analysis. (A map illustrating current populations
and genetic regions is available at http://dnatribes.com/populations.html.)
After your testing is complete, your analysis can be updated at any times

Table of Contents:
Introduction ………………………. 1
An Updated Analysis of the Italian Sub-Region ………. 2
Historical Background ……………….. 2
Genetic Analysis of the Italian Sub-Region ……………………. 4
Getting the Most from Your Testing ………………………….. 6

http://dnatribes.com/dnatribes-digest-2010-11-30.pdf

Table of Contents:
Introduction ……………………………. 1
Romani Links to Europe and South Asia ……………….. 2
Historical Background …………. 2
Genetic Analysis of Romani (European Gypsies) ……………. 4
Getting the Most from Your Testing ……………………………. 5

http://dnatribes.com/dnatribes-digest-2010-07-30.pdf

Table of Contents:
Introduction …………………… 1
An Updated Analysis of the Portuguese Sub-Region ………….. 2
Historical Background ………………….. 2
Genetic Analysis of the Portuguese Sub-Region ………………. 4
Getting the Most from Your Testing …………………………… 6

http://dnatribes.com/dnatribes-digest-2010-12-31.pdf

Ethnic Ancestry Sources and Further Reading:

A series of articles on
Race
Main topics
Race and genetics
Human genetic variation
Human genetic clustering
Health
Population groups in biomedicine
Ancestry and health
Ethnicity and health
Race and intelligence
Social
Historical definitions
The Race Question (1950)
Social interpretations of race
Race in the United States
Race in Brazil
Related
Ethnic group
Human evolution
Genetics
Racism topics
Category: Race

http://www.ornl.gov/sci/techresources/Human_Genome/elsi/humanmigration.shtml

http://dienekes.blogspot.com/2010/08/mother-of-us-all-lived-200-thousand.html

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